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Discussion Starter #1
Im going to be starting my roll cage in a few weeks but i was wondering what weldering should i use? I was thinking either Mig, or Arc welder, what do you guy think. Im using DOM 1.75x.120

Michael
 

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I would use a mig, easier and faster, but either will work fine.
 

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do you feel safe with building your cage, not trying to put you down man, thats not the point, a cage can be a very deadly thing if not put together right, it can kill you not save you, just wanting you to be safe man.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Im kindly know what im doing but my shop teacher is helping me and he has built a few roll cages before.
 

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Mig it!!!
 

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i'd use a wire-feed welder, but stick will work also. wire's just easier..

mig or flux? doesn't matter. i weld flux because its more convinient for me (don't have to haul the gas around).

i'd weld MIG though
 

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yeah, wire weld it. flux will give you some nice, clean welds and cost a bit less than mig since you dont have to get your gas plus like spawn said you dont have to drag the tanks around. mig will give you even nicer welds but at a bit more of a cost and be a bit more cumbersom.
 

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Personally, if it were me, and I was installing this "roll bar/roll cage" with the idea that it's being installed because I might, in fact, NEED it's protection, I would TIG it. If you don't know how to TIG, perhaps your shop teacher does. If not, you're probably going to have to pay somebody or find somebody who's willing to trade out for some TIG work.

When properly welded, nothing is stronger than a TIG weld and is the method used by 95%+ of chassis builders. It is expensive and difficult to master (in terms of learning how to TIG weld), but is a very clean weld and, as I stated, extremely strong. A benefit to it, also, when welding on the interior of a vehicle (such as a welding a roll bar or cage in a street-strip car) is that TIG welding, again when properly done, produces no slag (sparks) to worry about catching interior pieces on fire or melting them. *CLARIFICATION: I'm not advocating anybody TIG weld in the interior of a car without having the surrounding interior parts properly protected from the welding being done*
 

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MIG with gas is the best way(except for TIG, but TIG units are $$). As stated above, all sanctioning bodies require cages to be MIG/GAS, or some are now requireing TIG.. Arch welding won't pass...so I say play it safe and use MIG.
 

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tig is bling for a off-road rig. Welding HREW .120 wall with a MIG welder is just fine. If you were jumping sand cars I'd reccomend using chromoly and TIG weld.... but yaaaaa.....
 

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On 2006-01-09 00:02, supportTHEezln wrote:
HREW is also not allowed by a lot of sanctioning bodies. good job on the DOM

yeahhhhhhh like race cars... not old ford pick up trucks... Unneccesary expense. HREW is not weak. He's not gonna be hittin the walls of daytona at 200 MPH.
 

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On 2006-01-06 11:51, Douche Bigalow wrote:
Personally, if it were me, and I was installing this "roll bar/roll cage" with the idea that it's being installed because I might, in fact, NEED it's protection, I would TIG it. If you don't know how to TIG, perhaps your shop teacher does. If not, you're probably going to have to pay somebody or find somebody who's willing to trade out for some TIG work.

When properly welded, nothing is stronger than a TIG weld and is the method used by 95%+ of chassis builders. It is expensive and difficult to master (in terms of learning how to TIG weld), but is a very clean weld and, as I stated, extremely strong. A benefit to it, also, when welding on the interior of a vehicle (such as a welding a roll bar or cage in a street-strip car) is that TIG welding, again when properly done, produces no slag (sparks) to worry about catching interior pieces on fire or melting them. *CLARIFICATION: I'm not advocating anybody TIG weld in the interior of a car without having the surrounding interior parts properly protected from the welding being done*

tig is not the strongest. it is the most precise. a weld is a weld. each process can produce the same strength on standard materials when each is performed properly. tig just gives you more control over the heat applied and the speed of the filler metal being fed in. i would definately tig a cage if i were doing it, but thats because i own a nice tig. expect that to take probably a month or more of solid work because tig is not fast and its not easy.

tig is also the easiest to mess up on. all surfaces have to be immaculant, or you will get inclusions. inclusions will create weak points in your welds and lead to failure. mig is a little more forgiving in that aspect, but you should prepare the surface as best as you can get it either way. the cleaner the surface, the better your end result will be.

btw zaz, slag is not sparks. sparks are just that - sparks of the filler material that are jumping off. you are correct that tig creates no sparks (with a clean surface) and that it create no slag, but they are not the same. slag is that ugly stuff that encapsulates the weld bead on flux core and stick welding.
 

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On 2006-01-09 15:28, HaWiiLuVeR wrote:


tig is not the strongest. it is the most precise. a weld is a weld. each process can produce the same strength on standard materials when each is performed properly. slag is that ugly stuff that encapsulates the weld bead on flux core and stick welding.

:withstupid: There are alot of things that stick welding is used for, and tig and mig would not be good choice, just for example, all natural gas transmission lines are stick welded. Pipe sizes 2" to 48" and bigger. Most of those lines have at least 1000 psi. All platforms and rigs offshore are welded with stick and they hold up to hurricane force winds.
 

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Stick welding isn't all bad, but you figure most of the gas lines and oil rig stuff is x-rayed for weld quality..and those guys are the best at what they do...when you do it all day, every day, you get real good.. Those guys can lay a bead with a stick that looks like it was done with a machine...

But for me, I learned on stick, but will never go back..I love my MIG. I would love to have a Miller Bobcat, mainly for building stuff outside away from power sources..
 

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On 2006-01-09 11:00, MUCHADO wrote:


yeahhhhhhh like race cars... not old ford pick up trucks... Unneccesary expense. HREW is not weak. He's not gonna be hittin the walls of daytona at 200 MPH.

DOM is cheap. I just bought a length for $74. Why wouldn't you use it? =] Only cheapass rednecks use HREW =]
 

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On 2006-01-09 23:16, supportTHEezln wrote:


DOM is cheap. I just bought a length for $74. Why wouldn't you use it? =] Only cheapass rednecks use HREW =]

no, rednecks use SCH40 gas line.....

A guy that I know runs Jackson Motorsports.... a buggy building shop... I ran by the dillema of what material to use on my EXO cage... and he said on a 4x4 trail/rock rig that he wouldn't advise spending the extra money on DOM. HREW and DOM are almost the same.... HREW has a visible seam and DOM doesnt. 74 dollars for a 20 foot stick? yeahh cheap my a$$... HREW is around 40 bucks for the same stick. :roll:
 
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