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Discussion Starter #1
I remember a thread I read a while back about being able to hook the tranny temp guage sender to a "service port" on the tranny. This required no drilling into the pan, and according to the thread, it gives a more accurate reading.

Does anyone know the size of the service port & fitting size needed, and the exact location (pics would be best). I don't want to remove the wrong cap and have my tranny (46RE) FUBAR'd.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #2
TTT
 

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Here ya go man
http://www.pavementsucks.com/forums/viewtopic.php?topic=77901&highlight=temp+gauge
 

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Discussion Starter #4
thanks :bigthumb: Just found a water temp gauge on clearance for $14 at autozone. Came with metric adapters in the package. I will probably drill the pan and install lock nuts on both sides with some RTV. Will let yall know how it goes and take pics...may be a little while before I get it done since it's about 15-30 degrees right now.


edit: it should work since the temp range is 100 - 250 right?
 

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As for the thread about sticking it in the tranny...I have this bit of info:

This thread was ran on another board too...the consensus was using the ports in the tranny were not giving "real" fluid temperature, but tranny case temperature. The ports used only have fluid in them sometimes...and the one actually can damage the tranny if you screw too long of a sender into it.

The only real way to measure trany fluid temp is either drill the pan (not really accurate, but I did this) or install the sender in the transmission line.

I installed the sender in the pan...it gave at least an idea of what fluid temp was that the tranny was using, albeit it wasn't as hot as it could have been because it wasn't reading TC temps, it was still something.

I also had my sender installed in one of the ports on the tranny...it worked, but did not fluctuate as much as in the pan...it did not hurt the tranny.

Hope this helps,

steved
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks, i would also just like an idea of what the temp tranny is at. My concern is during towing ang wheeling.
I will be installing in the pan, not the service port.
 

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If they were anything like mine, low.

108*F day, towing 5k in heavy stop and go traffic, 180* in the pan.

117*F across the TX panhandle, running 75mph, 130* in the pan.

35*F, normal driving, below the lowest gradation which was 100*F.

25*F, 1st gear pulling uphill (all four wheels spinning for well over 5 miles just to keep moving in 12 inch deep slush), about 150*F IIRC.

It was sorta funny because I installed mine in the middle of winter...after driving all over the guage never moved...so I sent it back for a new one...same deal...I actually figured out that it was right when I return to pull this one and the pan was only lukewarm.

steved
 
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Pan isnt the most accurate either. For the msot accurate temp, you need to put the gauge on the output tranny cooler line
 

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On 2005-12-05 10:12, v10sport wrote:
Pan isnt the most accurate either. For the msot accurate temp, you need to put the gauge on the output tranny cooler line

Agreed...but pan is better than nothing.

steved
 

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Discussion Starter #10
:withstupid: Agreed that the line going to the cooler would be more accurate, but I don't want to chance damaging the line. Plus I don't have easy access to the proper connectors.
Like said above, i can get a baseline reading with the sensor in the pan, and I will know what the normal range is and can better tell if the tranny is operating over that or not.

edit: and I don't want to reduce the efficiency of the factory cooler aparatus. it's not super efficient as is, and I don't want it to cool any less than it already does by introducing resistance/blockage in the line.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok, got all the stuff together for the temp gage install.
Can I just drill the pan and install the fitting in there? I am planning on putting a nut behind it (on the interior of the pan) to help hold it in place. Is there anything else I have to do? RTV around the fitting maybe?
Just don't want to create a new problem.
What does the B&M drain plug kit consist of?
thanks
 

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The sensor is a Pipe thread (NPT), which is different than a bolt.

What I did:

Attempt #1, I cut a pipe collar in half and found a non-interference portion of the pan to drill a 0.5" hole...I then brazed the pipe collar to the pan and screwed my sensor into that...but this requires brazing.

Attempt #2, I got lazy and ordered a tranny plug kit from Summit Racing (A B&M IIRC)...drill a hole, insert and tighten fitting, insert and tighten sensor...done.

#2 is the easiest and works good...when I did it, I ordered two fittings...one for the bottom of the pan to drain with, and one for the side of the pan to hold the sender...makes tranny servicing a whole lot easier with the fluid drained.

There are no pictures, but you get the idea:

http://store.summitracing.com/default.asp?Ntt=B%26M&x=0&y=0&searchinresults=false&Ntk=KeywordSearch&DDS=1&N=115&target=egnsearch.asp

Summit Part Number BMM-80250...search it and that will give you what I used.

steved
 

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Discussion Starter #13
thanks, the only problem i see is that my sensor uses 1/2 NPT and the plug kit is 1/8 NPT...
I will look for some with larger apertures, if not I will go by home depot and pick up a fitting (brass) to match up with the fitting I have and use that as a backing plate, along with some RTV.
 
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